DIPLOMA IN COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY

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Top KAPA Tips for Wedding Photography

Posted on: July 8, 2017 at 6:57 am

Wedding photography is big business. No longer is it merely a record of the happenings of the wedding day, but photographers now shoot pre or post wedding creative shots, coupled with candid images on the wedding day, lots of post production, and sometimes a meticulously designed hand crafted album to go with it. Here are a few tips to keep in mind if you are shooting your first wedding –

  1. Get behind the scenes images. This might mean arriving at an understanding beforehand with the client, that you will need access to the bride and groom’s rooms as they apply the finishing touches to their attire.
  2. Look for fine details. It is the small details that can make the wedding couple’s album and memories come to life later. Look for things like the colors of nail polish, the flower in the groom’s coat etc. 
  3. When in doubt, shoot more! Wedding moments are as candid as they get. You don’t want to miss out on a single special moment. The way out is only to shoot as much as you can, and then painstakingly select the best in the post production stage. 
  4. It might be a good idea to set up a studio corner’ at the reception. Not only will it help identify the important guests as the bride and groom walk by with them to the photography area, it will also give you an opportunity to use studio lighting. 
  5. Try and not be too obtrusive at crucial moments. While you need to be bold and capture the right moments, the same can also be done without disturbing the moment. Tele lenses can help here. You can perch yourself at a vantage point such as the end of an aisle, where you know the couple is going to walk by. Then, just wait for the right moment!
  6. Try and have at least 2 photographers working together. Its difficult for one camera to capture every moment, and sometimes hard to quickly change lenses if you have to. It is a good idea to have a minimum of 2 photographers, working from different angles, one with a 24-70 lens and the other with a 70-200…